D0191 Interactive influences of trap height and atrifical attractant on adult Culicidae collection diversity

Monday, December 13, 2010
Grand Exhibit Hall (Town and Country Hotel and Convention Center)
S. C. Welschmeyer , Life and Physical Sciences, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, MO
ML. Mire , Life and Physical Sciences, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, MO
AR. Bamber , Life and Physical Sciences, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, MO
Jesica R. Jacobs , Life and Physical Sciences, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, MO
Jennifer Dinan , Life and Physical Sciences, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, MO
P.S. Stovall , Life and Physical Sciences, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, MO
JR. Benne , Life and Physical Sciences, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, MO
Determining the host seeking habits of various adult female mosquitoes is important in monitoring disease transmission cycles. Various hosts are found at numerous heights and release a diverse spectrum of olfactory attractants. Our laboratory traditionally collects adult mosquitoes by trapping with CDC miniature light traps hung about five feet off the ground on shepherdÂ’s hooks using dry ice as a carbon dioxide attractant. In order to determine if these methods could be improved upon with alternate attractant and/or height combinations, traps were set at one foot height intervals ranging from one to five feet from ground level. Differing attractants were used, which included dry ice, octenol and a combination of both. During the survey 152 mosquitoes were captured and identified to 12 species. Results indicated that dry ice was significantly better as an attractant when compared to octenol and the majority of the specimens were collected from the dry ice treatment. Species diversity was increased when dry ice and octenol were combined. Height preference was approaching significance when comparing one foot to four foot. Although the total number of mosquitoes collected in this study is small, the effects of trap height and attractant do seem to influence the number and types of mosquitoes collected. Information concerning success of attractant and height combinations is very useful when organizing efficient collection efforts.

doi: 10.1603/ICE.2016.49840