Tuesday, 19 November 2002 - 9:20 AM
0569

This presentation is part of : Host Barriers to Infection by Insect Pathgens: Integration of Diverse Disciplines

Infection processes for entomopathogenic microsporidia

James Becnel, CMAVE, USDA Agricultural Research Service, CMAVE, P.O. Box 14565, Gainesville, FL

Microsporidia are unique among parasitic organisms in the development of a highly sophisticated mechanism for direct inoculation of a germ cell (sporoplasm) into the cytoplasm of a host cell. All microsporidian spores contain a polar filament that, on appropriate stimulation within the gut, rapidly discharges the filament, which everts to become a hollow tube. The tremendous pressure within the spore at discharge (up to about 60 atm) propels the sporoplasm through the tube (which can reach lengths of up to 500Ám!) into a host cell thus avoiding host defense systems. This process will be described in detail with emphasis on spore germination stimuli within the gut environment of insect hosts.

Keywords: insect pathogen

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